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Monthly Archives: November 2016

This week we have started working on our next project for the Bare Cones Configuration Guide series, which has been to start uplifting the Configuring the General Ledger guide from the Dynamics AX 2012 version to the Dynamics 365 for Operations release. Rather than wait to finish all of the 8 chapters before releasing out this content we have decided to release them out individually as we get them finished.

We are happy to say that the first module for the General Ledger is available and if you want to check it out here are all of the details.

BBCG03: Configuring the General Ledger within Dynamics 365 for Operations
MODULE 1: Configuring the General Ledger Controls

Before we can start posting to the General Ledger, there is a little bit of housekeeping that we need to do in order to set up all of the codes and controls. We need to configure our accounts that we will want to use within the ledger, set up our chart of accounts and also configure some of the defaults for posting to the ledger.

In this guide we will step you through the initial configuration of the General Ledger so that you can then start using it.

Topics Covered

  • Adding Currency Codes
  • Configuring the System Parameters
  • Adding additional Main Account Categories
  • Importing Main Account Categories through the Excel Add-In
  • Configuring a new Chart of Accounts
  • Adding a new Main Account to the Chart of Accounts
  • Creating a Main Account Import Template
  • Populating the Import Template
  • Configuring Account Structures
  • Creating a new Fiscal Calendar
  • Configuring a Company Ledger
  • Configuring the Accounts for Automatic Transactions

This module actually shrank a little from the AX 2012 version because of the improved way that we can import data from Excel and even create custom import templates using the Workbook Designer. That feature by itself is worth a peek at this guide.

If you are interesting in checking this guide out (or the earlier versions like the one for AX 2012) then here is a link to the all of the versions of this guide: http://bit.ly/2gHSjjv

If you are really up for a challenge then you may want to take on the Bare Bones Configuration Challenge. You can start with this guide and as we start releasing out the other 15 guides in the series then you can work through them as well. These guides will teach you how to configure a bare bones installation of Microsoft Dynamics 365 from scratch. If you complete all sixteen modules then you will become a Bare Bones Configuration Privateer and we will send you a badge to prove it.

Or if you want to go retro then you can do exactly the same thing with Dynamics AX 2012 – all of the guides are already available.

Also, if you want all of the content on the site and all of the new content that we are delivering then you may want to think about signing up for a Premium Membership. Once you have that you can plunder the entire site and download any of the books at any time. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/2fYMgTW

Watch out for use to release more modules as we get them finished over the next weeks.

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In the past importing data into Microsoft Dynamics has been a little bit of work. The Data Management tools within Dynamics 365 for Operations makes it a little easier to package data up into data sets.

But if we want an easier way to import in data then there is a second option which is the Excel Workbook Designer which allows us to create Excel templates directly from the data entities and then use them to access and even import data within minutes.

In this walkthrough we will show how you can use this feature to do this by creating an import template that imports in Main Accounts in to the ledger.

Creating a Main Account Import Template

The first thing that we will want to do is create a new Excel Workbook that we will use to import in the data. Luckily this is a super simple task.

How to do it…

To do this, open up the navigation panel, expand out the Modules group, and click on the Organization administration module and click on the Excel workbook designer menu item within the Office integration subgroup of the Setup menu group.


Alternatively you can search for the Excel workbook designer form by clicking on the search icon in the header of the form (or press ALT+G) and then type in excel into the search box. Then you will be able to select the Excel workbook designer maintenance form from the dropdown list.

This will open up the Workbook designer form listing all of the data entities that we can create template from.


We want to create an import template for the Main account data entity so we will start off by filtering down the entities by typing in main into the filter box.

That will filter out most of the data entities and then we will be able to select the MainAccount data entity.

Also within the Available fields list box we will see all of the fields from the entity that we can use within our import template.

Start off by selecting the Chart of accounts field and click on the right arrow button.


This will move the Chart of accounts field over to the Selected fields list box.


Then add the Main account, Name, Main account type and Main account category fields over to the Selected fields list.

Now that we have all of the fields that we need to set up the Main Accounts we can click on the Open workbook link within the menu bar.


When the Open in Excel panel is displayed we will then be asked where we want to save the file to.

In this example we will just download the file locally and click on the Download button.


This will open up a dialog box and allow us to save the Excel file locally, or just open it up. In this example we just click on the Open option.


This will then open up the Excel template for us. In order to see all of the data and also use the Office Add-In you may be asked to Enable Editing buy clicking on the button in the header.


The add-in will now link up with Microsoft Dynamics, retrieve all of the metadata for the Main Account entity and then retrieve all of the data for the entity as well.

We can now see all of the data within Excel that we had within the main interface.


Populating the Import Template

Now we have a template that we can use for the import. All that is left to do before we start importing in all of our Main Accounts is to fill in all of the data into the template.

How to do it…

Step 1: Open the Main Account template

To do this we will return back to our Excel workbook and refresh the connection.


Step 2: Enter in the Main Accounts and save the file

Now can now enter in all of your main accounts into the templates columns.

If you want to use a standard set of main accounts, then we have made this a little simpler and have created a CSV file with all of the necessary Main Accounts that will be used throughout these guides. We have posted them on the Dynamics AX Companions (http://www.dynamicscompanions.com) site. If you don’t want to manually enter in a few hundred accounts, then just download this version them and then copy and paste the data over into the import worksheet.


To update the Main Accounts within Microsoft Dynamics, all we have to do is click on the Publish link within the Office Add-In.


When we return back tour Chart of accounts we will now see that all of the Main accounts have been added to our Standard
Chart of accounts.


Conclusion

This is a huge improvement over what we used to have to do in order to import in data. We don’t have to even create the connections within Excel, the Worksheet designer does all of this for us.

How cool is that!


Office Teams are a great new collaboration tool that we can take advantage of within Office 365, and if we are using Office Groups then we can convert them into Teams and start taking advantage of the collaboration that it adds, but still take advantage of the Groups at the same time.

In this walkthrough we will show how you can start doing this.

Prepping your Office 365 Group for Teams

Public Groups cannot be converted into Teams, but Private ones can. So the first thing that we need to do is to make sure that the Group that we want to convert is a Private group.

How to do it…

To do this start off by opening up the Office Group that you want to make available as a Team.


Then click on link on the group and select the Edit group option.


And then when the Edit group panel is displayed, check that the Privacy setting is set to Private – Only approved members can see what’s inside.

Then click on the Save button to close the panel.


Review

Once we have made sure that the Group is Private we can move on.

Converting an Office Group to a Team

Now that we have a Private team we can convert it to an Office Team.

How to do it…

To do this, open up Teams and then click on the Create team button in the bottom left of the screen.


When the Create your team form is displayed, rather than creating a team from scratch, click on the Yes, add Microsoft Team Functionality link at the bottom of the form.


This will open up a list of all the Groups that you can enable through Teams and then click on the Choose team.


That will then make the Group show up in the Team list.


Review

How cool is that. Now we can access the Group, or collaborate within a Team.

Moving files to Your Team Channel

One piece of housekeeping that we need to take care of after we have surfaced the Group as a Team is to move any files that you have stored away within the group. The file structure will change a little with each conversation creating a folder within the group files. So to make them available within Teams we just need to move them a little.

How to do it…

For example when we create the team then by default a General conversation is created.


If we swap over to the Group we will see that there is a folder for the General Conversation.


If we have any files then just click on the option button for the file and then click on the Move to link.


This will open the Move options panel and we can select the conversation folder that we want to move the file to.


Then click on the Move here button.


That will move the file to the conversation.


Review

All you need to do is move any other files over to any other conversations that you have.

Summary

How cool is this – Teams supercharge the Groups functionality.

With the release of Microsoft Dynamics 365 this month we have started the process of updating all of our content to include versions of the guides especially for this version. We are happy to say that the first one is in the can and if you want to check it out here are all of the details.

BBCG02: Configuring An Legal Entity Within Dynamics 365 for Operations

There is no better way to start learning Dynamics 365 for Operations then to just dive in and start setting it up from a blank slate. As you start sculpting your system you are able to see how everything fits together and will also give you the muscle memory that will make you a ninja when it comes to using it in the future.

For traditional ERP systems, this is easier said than done because you need to first get the system installed, and then you don’t know where to even start. Luckily with Azure Hosting, and the pre-built demonstration environments that Microsoft deliver through their Lifecycle services, firing up a new system to learn in is a breeze.

In the following guide we will show you how to set up all of the necessary codes and controls within the Organizational area of a new Dynamics 365 for Operations environment so that when you do start setting up the Dynamics 365 for Operations system, everything will run smoothly for you.

Topics Covered

  • Configuring The System For The First Time
  • Configuring Your Organizational Settings
  • Configuring Your Legal Entity

We have expanded the content from the original version that was written for Dynamics AX 2012, including the new ways that we are able to import in data directly from import packages. For example – now you don’t have to hunt around for the zip code import file, it’s available through Lifecycle Services.

If you are interested in checking this guide out (or the earlier versions like the one for AX 2012) then here is a link to the all of the versions of this guide: http://bit.ly/2f7xHyE

If you are really up for a challenge, then you may want to take on the Bare Bones Configuration Challenge. You can start with this guide and as we start releasing out the other 15 guides in the series then you can work through them as well. These guides will teach you how to configure a bare bones installation of Microsoft Dynamics 365 from scratch. If you complete all sixteen modules, then you will become a Bare Bones Configuration Privateer and we will send you a badge to prove it.

Or if you want to go retro then you can do exactly the same thing with Dynamics AX 2012 – all of the guides are already available.

Also, if you want all of the content on the site and all of the new content that we are delivering then you may want to think about signing up for a Premium Membership. Once you have that you can plunder the entire site and download any of the books at any time. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/2fYMgTW

Also you may have noticed that we have had a small rebranding of the site – with the dropping of the AX from Dynamics, we decided to do the same as well. Now we are just Dynamics Companions.

Why is this important? Because that means we can now create content for you on all of the Microsoft Dynamics suite – how cool will that be.